Sheffield Woodland Connections

 

sheffield-woodland-connections-img_2804.jpg

A small team of the Department of Landscape’s alumni organised four interpretive walks in Ecclesall Woods in 2017 to celebrate the launch of the Woodland Charter

The team, Sheffield Woodland Connections (SWC), consists of five post-graduate alumni from the Landscape Department. SWC is part of the national Tree Charter campaign, which celebrates the 800th anniversary of the Charter of the Forest (issued in the same period as the Magna Carta). Coordinated by the Woodland Trust, the goal of the Tree Charter campaign is to instil understanding, engagement and fascination in trees and woodlands. The interpretive walks that SWC has offered in Ecclesall Woods since April 2017 have been met with consistent enthusiasm and interest. In addition to learning about woodland ecology and ID skills, participants are invited to measure trees, and to share their sketches and poems. Read more…

Green infrastructure in reducing urban runoff – does size matter?

Hannah IMG_4007

Siti Nur Hannah Ismail

At a recent Flower Show held in Chatsworth (The RHS Chatsworth Flower Show 2017),  the Royal Horticultural Society and the Landscape Department designed a garden specifically to address the effects of climate change, The Garden for a Changing Climate. Various types of shrubs and low-growing plants were displayed in the garden to increase awareness of the need to adapt gardens to a changing climate. Selection was based on functional traits that contribute to reducing negative effects associated with extreme weather events, such as flooding. The displays were very popular, and attracted much attention from gardeners and visitors to the show – most saying that they would like to have these in their own garden because not only are they beautiful and colourful, but they can also help save the environment!

Displays such as this are made possible from results of focussed research. The PhD research presented here looked into the role of low-growing plants for rainfall interception. Aimed at contributing to the scientific knowledge that supports the application of small-scale green infrastructure in mitigating flood risks, this research investigated how different leaf traits affected moisture retention. Read more…

Students learn to explore layers of landscape

DCIM100MEDIADJI_0020.JPGFirst-year students explore the dimensions of the landscape of Loxley Valley through various media

Olaf Schroth

At the beginning of their second semester, our students explore the various dimensions of landscape through time, from history and geology to current planning policy and future landscape change. In addition to the lectures and workshops in our studio, students undertake two field trips to Loxley Valley near Sheffield. Learning Technologist Paul Buck supported them on site this year with 360’ photography and drone-based imagery (read the full story ). Read more…

New Adventures in Technology Enhanced Fieldwork

drone-photo-1

Paul Buck

Here at the Department of Landscape, we’re always looking for new, creative ways of using technology to enhance student learning (TEL). This is one of my key roles as the department’s Learning Technologist. A recent example of this is a collaboration with lecturer Olaf Schroth and university teacher Thom White. Olaf, Thom and I get equally excited when we discover new technology that we can get creative with and repurpose for use in Landscape Architecture,  and that has the possibility of enhancing the learning and teaching experience for students and ourselves. Read more…

Joining the Green Dots

Selman P1080365Professor Paul Selman

Not everyone noticed, but in the 1980s we had an industrial revolution. Based on liquid silicon, this revolution was every bit as far-reaching and disruptive as the 19th century’s industrial revolution based on coal. It was swift and clean rather than ugly and polluting. The economy flourished, often in discreet business parks near attractive market towns, leaving behind rust belts and urban decay.

Read more…

Getting Creative when your PHD changes direction

Camilla Allen

How might you react to the news that the subject of your research, which in my case is Africa’s Great Green Wall, changes direction?

At the start of the second year of a Landscape History PhD – at this middle point – it seemed appropriate to reflect on my experiences so far: the hopes and realities of the remaining time I will be working on this project, and why being part of the Creative Spatial Practices cluster offers an important perspective on my work so far.

Read more…

“If you see a thousand faces then it is good for you”

Clare Rishbeth

This four-minute film shows the brightness of lungi fabric against long cold granite benches in a square in East London. A group of older women chat and laugh as they spend time here, amongst a busy mix of commuters and school kids, pigeons and dogs.

00-nepali_ladies-website-smaller-group

Watch clip of Alone Together: the Social Life of Benches

Read more…

Lessons from Kazakhstan, lessons from the inside…

 

Eckart Lange

Should we all rethink and investigate what we could teach and learn out there in the real word rather than in lecture theatres, studios, seminar rooms, laboratories etc.?

Read more…

Lessons from the terraces – travels in the Philippine Cordilleras

MA Landscape Architecture student Charles Lamb is one of the two winners of the 2016 Landscape Institute Student Travel Award. Charles travelled to the Philippines to research indigenous forms of water management in the Cordilleras, the chain of mountain ranges in the northern region of the island of Luzon.

Read more…

Ross Cameron hosts this years’ “RHS John MacLeod Annual Lecture”

Held every autumn, this influential RHS lecture invites prominent speakers to explore important horticultural issues. Hosted by the RHS at the Lindley Hall in London, the John MacLeod Annual Lecture was created to highlight important and inspiring topics on horticultural science. Read more…

%d bloggers like this: